Gene Therapy Comes of Age: Promising Treatment Option for Human Diseases

To help focus the global search for a treatment, the researchers aim to provide a comprehensive resource of possible lines of attack against SARS-Cov-2 and related coronaviruses.

Gene therapy and selected antivirals such as remdesivir are the most promising approaches in the fight against COVID-19 pandemic, according to a review of studies. The study, published in the journal Frontiers in Microbiology, analysed approaches for not only SARS-CoV-2 and its relatives such as SARS-Cov that causes Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and MERS-Cov that causes the Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), but also as yet unknown strains which will inevitably emerge in the future.

Download PDF Brochure of Study, Click Here!

“Coronaviruses represent a true threat to human health and the global economy,” said Ralph Baric, a professor at the University of North Carolina in the US. “We must first consider novel countermeasures to control the SARS-Cov-2 pandemic virus and then the vast array of high-threat zoonotic viruses that are poised for human emergence in the future,” Baric said.

To help focus the global search for a treatment, the researchers aim to provide a comprehensive resource of possible lines of attack against SARS-Cov-2 and related coronaviruses. They said first, and most effective approach is using vaccines.

Gene therapy in various forms has produced clinical benefits in patients with blindness, neuromuscular disease, hemophilia, immunodeficiencies, and cancer. Dunbar et al. review the pioneering work that led the gene therapy field to its current state, describe gene-editing technologies that are expected to play a major role in the field's future, and discuss practical challenges in getting these therapies to patients who need them.

In the present case, the most successful are likely to carry the receptor binding domain of the virus’s S-protein, which allows it to bind to and fuse with host cells, the researchers said. Besides the traditional live attenuated, inactivated, and subunit-based vaccines, modern types such as DNA/RNA-based and nanoparticle- or viral vector-borne vaccines should be considered, they said.

The researchers noted the second-most likely effective are broad-spectrum antivirals such as nucleoside analogues, which mimic the bases in the virus’s RNA genome and get mistakenly incorporated into nascent RNA chains, stalling the copy process. But because coronaviruses have a so-called “proofreading” enzyme which can cut such mismatches out, most nucleoside analogues don’t work well, according to the researchers.

However, exceptions seem to be beta-D-N4-hydroxycytidine and remdesivir, proposed by them as good candidates against SARS-Cov-2, they said.

Want to Know more about How Coronavirus Hijacks Your Cells??? Just go through the Link

For more info, get sample PDF copy of this study Here!!