Конспект курса Mobile Interaction Design. National research university High School of Economics

What is this course about

Mark Hassenzahs’s Model

  • Why? - level is related to user needs that the product
  • exmp. wake up well-rested and full of life
  • What? - addressed the things people can do though the product
  • exmp. A mobile app that may sing as a bird
  • exmp. A desk lamp starts to brighten gradually
  • How? - level addresses the way users interact with the product

Why? and What? includes:

  • UX design
  • product edsign
  • service design

How? includes:

  • Interaction design
  • Information Architecture
  • Visual Design - is carried around visual form
  • Motion Design
  • Sound Design

Product and services may differ in each of the three levels of the model

The How level is the typical realm of the interaction designer: to make given functionality accessible in an aesthetically pleasing way.

##UI Design vs Interaction Design

UI - all components of an interactive system that provide information and controls for the user to accomplish specific tasks with the interactive system.

Interaction Design - is design for human use. We need to envision the use, that is what a person is thinking, doing and feeling while interacting with app

The goal-directed Design process and Its “How” level. Part 1

The goal-directed design process

  1. Why? (understanding the problem —> Modeling Users)
  2. **What? **(setting the vision)
  3. **How? **(designing the product)

Features of the process:

  • Design as product definition
  • Designers as researches
  • Between research and blueprint: models, requirements, frameworks
  • the special attention to the transition from research to design

Understanding the problem (Why level)

activity

  • carrier
  • culture
  • device
  • attention and etc.

Modeling Users

persona - composite user archetype that represent distinct groupings of behaviors, attitudes, goals, drawn uo on the basis of user research results.

Goals as Motives

  • end goal: wake up in certain time
  • experience goal: wake up full-rested

The goal-directed Design process and Its “How” level. Part 2

Setting the vision (the What level)

  • define the problem
  • ideate
  • write context scenarios
  • identify requirements

defining the problem

Formats for describing design problems**

  • the goal directed design
  • stanford d.school design thinking: point-of-views
  • ibm’s design thinking: hills

Ideation - generating ideas

the problem statement:

  • sleep advices
  • gentle alarm with nature sounds
  • imitation of the sunrise
  • sleep phase tracking

Writing Context Scenarios

In scenarios, our focus should be on how people behave, think ,their feelings,

Storyboard example https://goo.gl/ZDXo4J

The goal-directed Design process and Its “How” level. Part 3

Designing the Product (How? level)

Inputs

  • From research phase:
  • Design-informing models
  • Design ideas and best practice from competing products
  • From the vision phase
  • Context scenarios
  • Requirements
  • Product KPIs - set of metrics. which show how well product solves the problem

Outputs (for GUI) - are pixel perfect markup for all screens of a mobile app

  • Mockups
  • Graphic assets
  • Design specifications

Evaluating - is hidden between What and How levels

What to evaluate:

  • the problem statement and product concepts
  • usability and aesthetic of interactions
  • worth (resulting benefits minus usage cost)

Principles of Human-Centered Design

  • the design is based upon an explicit understanding of users, tasks, and environments
  • the design is driven and refined by user-centered evaluation
  • the process in iterative
  • the design team includes multi-disciplinary skills
  • users are involved throughout design and development
  • the design addresses the whole user experience

The structure of the course

Usability Evaluation of A Chosen Mobile App

  • (why?) Empathize
  • Evaluate
  • week 3 - form recruitment criteria for usability testing
  • week 4 - develop a test plan
  • week 6 - select and submit the videos of test sessions
  • week 8 - write a usability evaluation report
  • (how?) Redesign (Mockplus app u can use for prototyping)
  • week 10 - make design changes and submit pixel-perfect mockups

The course structure

  • an introduction - 1 week
  • the content of the course and design process
  • essential concepts of interaction design
  • user research - 1 week
  • research planning and classification of research methods
  • recruiting
  • conducting cooper’s ethnographic interviews and analyze data
  • usability evaluation - 2 weeks
  • classifications of usability evaluation methods
  • essential usability evaluation concepts
  • usability inspection methods
  • field research
  • analyzing “Raw” Usability Data
  • design - 4 weeks
  • the process of design creation
  • accumulated design knowledge and best practices
  • designing user tasks and mobile information architecture
  • an intro to visual design of mobile user interface
  • catch up and final - 2 weeks

A Concept of Usability: Contextual Usability

Usability is something that users of any mobile app don’t even think about when it’s there but immediately notice when it’s gone.

Usability - extend to which a system, product or service can be used by specified users to achieve specified goals with effectiveness, efficiency and satisfaction in a specified context of use.

Usability include

  • Effectiveness - accuracy and completeness with which users achieve specified goals.
  • Metrics of effectiveness
  • percentage of tasks completed successfully on first attempt
  • number of uncorrected errors
  • rating scale for task success
  • Efficiency - resources expended in relation to the accuracy and completeness with which users archive goals.
  • Example of efficiency metrics
  • time to task
  • time spent on correcting errors
  • rating scale for a user’s performance
  • Satisfaction - freedom from discomfort, and positive attitudes to the use of the product
  • Examples of efficiency metrics
  • rating scale for ease of use
  • level of negative emotions
  • rating scale for overall satisfaction

A Context of Use: Context of Mobile Interactions. Part 1

Context of use - any information that can be used to characterize the situation of an entity. An entity is a person, place or object that is considered relevant to the interaction between a user and an application, including the user and the application themselves.

Barriers - anything that impedes user activities, interrupts workflow or communications, or interferes with the performance of work responsibilities.

Task - activities undertaken to achieve a specific goal.

User attributes

  • product skill/knowledge
  • system skill/knowledge
  • level of training
  • task experience
  • motivation
  • language skills
  • intellectual ability
  • age and etc..

A Context of Use: Context of Mobile Interactions. Part 2

Unique Features of Context of Mobile Interactions

  • Device
  • form-factor and screens
  • handhelds
  • mini-tablets
  • tablets
  • Handedness
  • sensors
  • battery life
  • Connection and carrier
  • Finite data
  • sketchy network
  • Attention
  • divided attention

A Context of Use: Design-Informing models

Design-Informing Models are not building blocks that appear directly in a design but are artifacts that embody, drive, inform, and inspire the design. They are design-oriented constructs, such as task descriptions or user personas, that turn raw data into actionable items as design ideas, as elements to consider or take into account in the design.

Examples:

  • persona
  • business process model
  • user journey map
  • hierarchical task analysis

What Models Do you Need to Create

  1. Why? (understanding the problem)
  2. Modeling users and…
  3. What? (setting the vision) + evaluating
  4. How? (designing the product) + evaluating

Personas - composite archetype

  • end goals
  • experience and life goals
  • behavior

Persona type

  • primary
  • secondary
  • supplemental
  • customer
  • served - are not users either
  • negative

Purposes of Using Personas

  • Communicate and build consensus
  • Determine
  • Evaluate
  • Contribute to other product-related effort